What is

Aortic stenosis?

Understanding the deadliest
type of heart valve disease

Up to 50% of people with severe aortic stenosis may die within 2 years after symptoms begin if left untreated.

Aortic stenosis (AS) is one of the most common types of heart valve disease, affecting millions in the US alone. It’s especially common in people 65 and older and affects 1 in 8 people over 75. So, what exactly happens with AS?

AS is the hardening of the aortic valve over time, causing the valve to tighten. This narrowing of the valve makes it harder for the heart to pump blood to the rest of the body. AS can vary in severity and gets worse over time. Don’t wait to talk to your doctor and understand your risk.

A model of a normal aortic valve of the heart A model of mild stenosis (thickening and stiffening of valve cusps) of the aortic valve of the heart A model of moderate stenosis (thickening and stiffening of valve cusps) of the aortic valve of the heart A model of severe stenosis (thickening and stiffening of valve cusps) of the aortic valve of the heart

Are you or a loved one at risk of aortic stenosis?

Take the questionnaire

Subtle, not silent. Recognize the symptoms of aortic stenosis

There’s no way to prevent aortic stenosis (AS), so it’s important to recognize the often subtle symptoms in yourself or a loved one. Don’t mistake them as just a part of getting older. Remember, symptoms are your heart’s way of telling you something is wrong.

LISTEN to your heart
to recognize the symptoms
of AS, no matter how subtle

Yellow L on blue background with lightheaded icon.

Lightheaded, faint, or dizzy feelings

Yellow I on blue background with heart icon.

Irregular heartbeat, heart flutter, or chest pains

Yellow S on blue background with lungs short of breath icon.

Shortness of breath after light activity or lying down

Yellow T on blue background with tiredness icon.

Tiredness, even if they've had plenty of sleep

Yellow E on blue background with swollen ankles icon.

Edema (swelling of the ankles and feet)

Yellow N on blue background with magnifying glass, not feeling like yourself icon.

Not feeling like yourself (missing out on daily activities)

Aortic stenosis doesn’t always come with symptoms at first.

Sometimes you can develop aortic stenosis (AS) and not have symptoms right away. Other diseases and illness, like chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and COVID-19, have similar symptoms.

This is why it’s so important to ask your doctor about an echocardiogram. It’s one of the most accurate ways to tell if you or a loved one has AS.

Are you or a loved one at risk of aortic stenosis?

Answer a few simple questions and get a personalized discussion guide to go over with your doctor.

Hi, are you taking this for you or someone else?

1

Please select an option.

Age

2

How old are you?

Please select an option.

Family history

3

Does your family have a history of heart conditions?

Please select an option.

Murmur

4

Have you been checked for an abnormal heart murmur?

Please select an option.

Echocardiogram

5

Have you ever had an echocardiogram, a simple heart ultrasound?

Please select an option.

Activity level

6

Compared to 6 months ago, do you still do daily activities and hobbies you’ve always enjoyed? (long walks, golf, cooking, time with family/friends, going to the store, etc.)

Please select an option.

Signs/Symptoms

7

Which of the below sound like you?

Please select an option.

Progress

0 of 7 questions completed

Hi, are you taking this for you or someone else?

1

Please select an option.

Age

2

How old are they?

Please select an option.

Family history

3

Do they have a family history of heart conditions?

Please select an option.

Murmur

4

Have they been checked for an abnormal heart murmur?

Please select an option.

Echocardiogram

5

Have they ever had an echocardiogram, a simple heart ultrasound?

Please select an option.

Activity level

6

Compared to 6 months ago, does it seem like they're avoiding their daily activities and hobbies they’ve always enjoyed? (long walks, golf, cooking, time with family/friends, going to the store, etc.)

Please select an option.

Signs/Symptoms

7

Which of the below sound like them?

Please select an option.

Progress

0 of 7 questions completed

Your heart is in your hands.
Take control of aortic stenosis today

Up to 50% of people with severe symptomatic aortic stenosis may die within just 2 years of first showing symptoms if left untreated.

There’s no way to prevent aortic stenosis (AS), but you can stay on top of it with routine echocardiograms and different treatment options. Together, you and your doctor will discuss the best treatment option for you. It’s important you receive treatment as soon as possible since AS gets worse over time.

Yellow heart encompassed by a turquoise arrow on blue background

Transcatheter procedure

If you’ve been diagnosed with severe AS, your doctor may recommend a transcatheter procedure. It’s a less invasive way to repair or replace your valve using a small tube, typically inserted in your leg, instead of an incision across your chest.

Yellow heart outline icon on blue background

Open heart surgery

Your doctor may recommend open heart surgery, which requires an incision to get to your valve and replace it. The incision is usually the full length of your chest, but sometimes it can be smaller. Once the incision is made, your old valve is removed and a replacement is surgically inserted.

Yellow heart cupped in a turquoise hand on blue background

Medical management

If you’ve been diagnosed with mild or moderate AS, your doctor may suggest monitoring your condition with regular follow-ups. Make sure to let your doctor know if your symptoms get worse or change and remember to get an echocardiogram regularly since AS gets worse over time.

Patient getting an echocardiogram while looking at the ultrasound monitor and smiling doctor.

Already diagnosed with aortic stenosis?
Interested in learning about treatment options?

Take control today

Next section

What’s a leaky valve?